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The Zook House

01 Jul

Zook HouseIn its day the towering Queen Anne Victorian on Washington Street stood as one of the grandest homes in the little town of Oregon, Missouri.  The home was built around 1880 for the early Oregon settler Zook family.  Levi Zook opened the first bank of Holt County with James Scott in 1867.  Zook and Roeker Bank began construction August 14th, 1913.  To this very day, one of the few remaining commercial structures in Oregon, Zook and Roeker bank still stands as a reminder of the family’s influence on the town.  From the road you’re immediately captivated by the homes bold large corner turret and decorative Gothic Revival Style gables and spire.  Even the smallest details such as the horse hitch near the road give little reminders of days gone by.

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What you can’t see from the road is the very first in-ground swimming pool and bath house in Oregon. Inside, you are greeted by a large staircase while a second servant’s stair case runs along the back. The home still has three sets of pocket doors on the main level. The second floor has five true bedrooms with 3 more bedrooms on the third floor which in its heyday served as a ballroom.  From one of the third floor bedroom windows (the three state window), you can see rolling hills for miles which are actually located in Kansas and Nebraska.

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For many years following the residence of the Zook family, the home was repurposed for the use as a senior home around the 1970’s.  During this time some rooms were added, most of which have been removed.

The home has been owned for 24 years by its current owner Debbie who due to unexpected circumstances was unable to see her dream of restoring the property come to fruition.  She explained, “When we first bought the house I used to walk through the rooms and try to imagine what life was like for the Zook family and how they would have lived.  I could just feel (positive) life in the house as we were working on it.  The rooms were so BIG it was hard not to stop and daydream about them.  The possibilities are endless.  I realize at this time in my life those dreams are meant for someone else, but I will always love this house”.

Recently Debbie has been contacted several times by the Chief of Police of Oregon and the city’s attorney with surmounting pressure to have the home demolished.  The idea of losing one of the few physical remnants of the area’s history combined with her own passion for the home has lead her to not only decide to sell the property, but to price the property at $10,000.   With Bob Brown, Payne Landing , Riverbreaks and Squaw Creek Wildlife refuge all in a stone’s throw of the home, Debbie believes that once the home is restored it will become a financial asset for its owners if used for either a hunting lodge or bed and breakfast. “It’s a beautiful quiet town with so much to offer with hunting, fishing, relaxation, bird watching, and mushroom hunting.  The leaves change into red and orange in the fall, the town turns into camouflage”.   There are eight additional conservation areas just in the county itself.

To contact Debbie for information on purchasing the property, she can be reached at:

816-456-2669 or 816-836-4054

 

Past to Present Research LLC

The Future of the Past is in the Stewardship of the Present

 

 

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3 responses to “The Zook House

  1. Gina Sifers

    July 1, 2016 at 5:05 pm

    Awesome home Audrey! Wow! Thanks for sharing…

    Gina Sifers Bella Media Services, LLC 816.456.7086 http://www.bellamediaservices.com gina@bellamediaservices.com

    On Fri, Jul 1, 2016 at 10:33 AM, Past to Present Research wrote:

    > past2presentresearch posted: “In its day the towering Queen Anne Victorian > on Washington Street stood as one of the grandest homes in the little town > of Oregon, Missouri. The home was built around 1880 for the early Oregon > settler Zook family. Levi Zook opened the first bank of Holt” >

     
  2. Kristen

    July 4, 2016 at 2:59 pm

    So beautiful! How much are they estimating it will cost to restore the home?

     
    • past2presentresearch

      July 4, 2016 at 3:38 pm

      I shared your question with the owner, she should be able to send you a restoration estimate via email. I sure hope someone decides to bring it back to life!

       

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